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New Orleans Motorist Makes Sure Entergy Knows About Walsh’s Act of Kindness

Published: 01/23/2018

Entergy New Orleans’ Sean Walsh was on his way to a job on Dec. 5 when he noticed a motorist pulled over on Highway 90 with a flat tire. What he did next will sound familiar, he said, because performing acts of kindness for others is part of the daily routine at Entergy.

“Everybody I work with would have done the same thing,” said Walsh, construction and maintenance mechanic at the company’s New Orleans East Service Center off Dwyer Road. “They’ve probably all helped someone like I did but just didn’t get recognized.” 

The stalled driver had turned on her hazard lights and was trying to change the tire herself when Walsh passed by in his service truck. She was alone and appeared to be struggling with the tools. 

“When I pulled over, I turned on my truck’s flashers as a safety precaution and to get other drivers to slow down,” Walsh said. “It only took me a few minutes to change the tire. I told her to get it checked right away because she didn’t want to be driving on the donut tire for too long. She shook my hand and thanked me and asked for my name.”

Not only did Dahlia Troublefield record Walsh’s first name, but she also noted the identification number on his truck and sent a message to Entergy New Orleans via social media about her experience. 

“He changed the tire so quickly!” she wrote. “I just wanted Entergy to know what a truly upstanding employee you have, who's representing the company well, even when duty doesn't require. I am so impressed I just had to tell you.”

Tad Patella, senior customer service manager in New Orleans, said he wasn’t surprised when he learned the identity of the employee who stopped to help Troublefield. 

“What Sean did was a true reflection of the Entergy culture and a testament to the great men and women who are part of the Entergy family,” Patella said. “I'm proud of Sean for going above and beyond by taking the initiative to help others in addition to providing outstanding service for Entergy’s customers.” 

Walsh is celebrating his five-year service anniversary this month and is a second-generation Entergy employee. His father works for the company, as do two of his uncles. Walsh said that helping others is a value that was ingrained in his upbringing and is now reinforced in his professional career. 

“I know that if it was my wife, or my mom or dad, I would want someone to stop and help,” he said. “It was a perfect example of what I’ve always been taught — to have integrity and to do the right thing when no one is looking. It’s how I was raised and how I’ve been trained. My son just turned 2, and I also want to pass those values down to him.”

Margaret Bucci